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Necrophilia, The Twisted Act Of Sexual Intercourse With Dead Bodies

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Lines between what is normal, decent and weird are getting blurred more and more each. From zoophilia and bestiality, we moved to necrophilia or  thanatophilia, which is the twisted act of sexual intercourse with dead bodies.

In a study by DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition) there are ten different types of necrophiliacs.

“The stages of necrophilia range from Level 1s who are role players that don’t actually have intercourse with bodies, to Level 4s who are aroused by touching a corpse, to Level 10s who exclusively have sex with corpses, and can’t even function sexually around a living human.”

Recently, a grieving widower in Bolivia was shock to discover a nurse at the Hospital de Clinicas in La Paz, was having sex with his wife’s dead boy.

Grover Macuchapi, 27, was caught in the morgue committing the sex act an hour after the patient died at the hospital and was transferred there.

“I saw what he was doing and hit him. He was moving and he had his trousers down,” the poor husband reportedly told a local newspaper.

The accused however said he had been in a trance: “Something happened. It was like a dream. The next thing I remember was feeling a blow from behind when the woman’s husband hit me.”

Macuchapi is now facing profanation charges as police chief Douglas Uzquiano confirmed the male nurse had sex with the man’s 28-year-old deceased wife.

“Relatives of the dead woman had gone to the hospital to cancel a debt they had for the medical treatment she received.

“The husband went to the morgue and saw a male nurse having sex with his late wife. The nursing assistant was committing the crime of necrophilia,” he said.

According to a study by Jonathan P. Rossman and Phillip J. Resnick, necrophiles are usually afraid of rejection, detailing “the most common motive of the true necrophiles was to possess an unresisting and unrejecting partner.”

Some other motives of necrophiles the study listed were “attempt to gain comfort,” and “attempt to gain self-esteem by the expression of power over a homicide victim.”

 

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About Author

Akin Akingbala is an international journalist based in Lagos, Nigeria. Aside being happily married, he has interests in music, sports and loves traveling.

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